Food for thought
Technosophy and Technosopher: theoresis and praxis of a “Digital” Architect & Designer

The 🇮🇹 version is at the bottom of this page here

 

“knowledge can no longer be ascribed to, or produced within disciplinary boundaries, but is entirely entangled”
– Oxman, 2016
1Oxman, N. (2016). Age of Entanglement. Journal of Design and Science. https://doi.org/10.21428/7e0583ad

 

Age of entanglement seems at times to be the manifesto against the demolition of the latest disciplinary barriers or rather those placed between theoresis and praxis in cultural speculation in the field of architectural design – age of engagement, the age of involvement, to make a commitment on multiple fronts seems tobe more appropriated.

 

Techné (skill + craft) ability to perform a certain activity with skill and wisdom Sophia means “wisdom”, ie the ability to use one’s knowledge and experience to formulate good judgments or formulate valid decision-making processes. A vision that underlines the already well-known shift of the design paradigm toward a procedural statute that is articulated around the digital elements that characterize the project itself.

Technosophy, therefore, is for me a kind of engineering philosophy applied to real problems.

 

The ability to articulate the technological project through its own digital elements has cleared the code of scripting/coding by integrating it directly into the pure design act for what purpose? – that of getting closer to the “modelization” of the built environment with its endogenous and exogenous peculiarities and at the same time allowing the designer to find a valid “tool” – all of this is largely enclosed in the concept of computational thinking and is the basis of the digital design nowadays – (building own tools is an ancient practice shortly this is my vision)

 

How is it possible to focus on the cultural speculative aspects and the practical dimension? 

With good reason we must start from the word Tools, attention not as commonly we mean a sort of BlackBox that is expected to make things work or that tells a project story instead of the designer, but rather as a metaphor for a tool, a cognitive tool – metaphor in the sense of not interpreting it as a physical/mechanical artefact but rather as a managerial tool, for the management and organization of processes that constantly give us feedback of any kind. This procedural statute enhances what in my opinion is the most important soft skill in the digital age, which is the ability to solve problems – Problem-solving and before that problem making.

Thus a fairly tenacious and evident asset is configured in the production of the digital project consisting of the triad Data – Digital – Design. The given something that is taken as it has no project value but if it is properly structured it can be transformed into something useful, that is, into information and thus a certain scientific bibliography (which also passes through Prof. Antonino Saggio) attributes to the built environment the value of data-space an informed, informative and informed space – it is here that the virtual and artificial aspect of Krueger and Rheingold is revealed (not the Cyberspace that appeared in Neuromance ‘s 1984 William Gibson). 

In any case, computational thinking allows for the organisation of this informed and informatic space and at the same time enhances the ability to interpret natural and artificial habitats.

 

Design techniques, on the other hand, tend to affect the tactical level with which one approaches to design. If the strategy is the way in which the general objectives to be pursued are identified, as well as the ability to identify the most suitable means to achieve them, its implementation will require a specific process. The tactical aspect inherent in digital design techniques, therefore, concerns a dynamic action in which the process changes and adapts to subsequent challenges (Sevaldson, 2005: 32)2Sevaldson, B., (2005). Developing Digital Design Techniques. Investigations on Creative Design Computing. Doctoral thesis. Oslo, Oslo School of Architecture and Design, p. 32.. On the other hand, elaborating a design strategy requires a more specific cultural and overall vision effort and, in this sense, the diagrammatic logic borrowed from the world of information technology (i.e. computational thinking) that facilitates the work of the digital designer, i.e. looking at objects no longer as such but as a succession of events, helping him to focus attention on the process.

In the Digital Age, it often happens that strategies and techniques tend to overlap and this overlapping inevitably produces an expressive and conceptual acceleration of the way in which the meanings of time, space and interaction are intrinsically articulated in the digital project (Frazer, 1995: 8)3Frazer, J. (1995). An evolutionary architecture. London, Architectural Association, p. 8.. All of this interests and involves the work and responsibilities of the digital designer ever more closely.

 

Conclusion

By hermetically summarizing this vision, the essential element in all the methods of digitized inference is aimed at revealing the intended space as a habitat, they relentlessly aim at the concept of Closing the gap – of “closing the cycle” – that is, guaranteeing that the real-life experience of the end-user is re-introduced into the technological design process and at the same time, allow us, allow the researcher/designer, through a series of possible research methods and instrumental metaphors, to construct a story of a problem or a research demand in order to extract meaning and therefore learn from it.

extra ref 4 Garber, R. (2009). Closing the gap: information models in contemporary design practice. Chichester: Wiley. 5Ambrosini, L., (2018), Data, Digital & Design – Produzione del progetto digital e processi decisionali: la progettazione “flessibile” nell’Era dello Scripting e del Building Information Modelling come nuovo paradigma tecnologico, PhD thesis in Architecture. XXXI ciclo, DiARC, Università di Napoli “Federico II”. DOI:  10.13140 / RG.2.2.27158.29769

 

 

 

 


 

🇮🇹 version

“knowledge can no longer be ascribed to, or produced within disciplinary boundaries, but is entirely entangled” Oxman, 2016

Age of entanglement sembra essere a tratti il manifesto contro l’abbattimento delle ultime barriere disciplinari o meglio quelle poste tra teoresi e praxis nella speculazione culturale nell’ambito della progettazione architettonica – age of engagement l’era del coinvolgimento, di assumersi l’impegno su molteplici fronti, sembra oggi essere il termine più appropriato.

 

Techné (skill + craft) capacità di eseguire con abilità e sapienza una certa attività e significa sophia “wisdom”, ossia la capacità di usare la propria conoscenza ed esperienza per formulare buoni giudizi o formulare validi processi decisionali. Una visione che sottolinea l’ormai già noto spostamento del paradigma progettuale verso uno statuto processuale che si articola attorno agli elementi digitali che caratterizzano il progetto stesso.

Tecnosofia, dunque è per me una sorta di filosofia ingegneristica applicata ai problemi reali.

La capacità di articolare il progetto tecnologico attraverso i suoi stessi elementi digitali ha sdoganato la programmazione in codice scripting/coding integrandola direttamente nell’atto progettuale puro. A quale che scopo? -quello di avvicinarsi sempre di più alla “modellizzazione” dell’ambiente costruito con le sue peculiarità endogene ed esogene e al contempo permettendo al progettista di trovare nella logica diagrammatica della disciplina informatica un valido “strumento” per una progettazione consapevole – tutto ciò è ampiamente racchiuso nel concetto di  computational thinking ed è alla base della dimensione pratica progettuale digitale – (costruire strumenti propri è una pratica antica in breve questa la mia visione).

 

In che modo è possibile mettere a fuoco gli aspetti speculativi culturali e la dimensione pratica? 

A buon motivo bisogna partire dalla parola Tools, attenzione non come comunemente si intendede ovvero una sorta di blackbox che ci si apetti faccia funzionare le cose o che racconti al posto del progettista una storia di progetto, ma piuttosto come una metafora di utensile, uno strumento cognitivo – metafora nel senso di non interpretarlo come artefatto fisico/meccanico ma piuttosto come strumento manageriale, di gestione ed organizzazione di processi che ci restituiscono costantemente feedback di qualsivoglia natura. Questo statuto processuale esalta quella che secondo me è la soft skill più importante nell’era digitale, ossia la capacità di risolvere problemi – problem solving e prima ancora il problem making.

Si configura così una asset abbastanza tenace ed evidente nella produzione del progetto digitale costituito dalla triade Data – Digital – Design

Il dato è qualcosa che preso così come è non ha valore di progetto ma se lo si struttura opportunamente può trasformarsi in qualcosa di utile, ossia, in informazione e così una certa bibliografia scientifica (che passa anche per il prof. Antonino Saggio) attribuisce all’ambiente costruito il valore di data-space uno spazio informato, ionformativo ed informato – è qui che l’aspetto virtuale ed artificiale di Krueger e Rheingold si palesano (non mensiono il Cyberspazio comparso nel romanzo Neuromance del 1984 di William Gibson). 

Ad ogni modo il pensiero computazionale permette di organizzare questo spazio informato e informatico e al contempo a potenziare la capacità di interpretare gli habitat naturali ed artificiali.

Le tecniche progettuali, invece, tendono ad interessare il livello tattico con cui ci si approccia alla progettazione. Se la strategia è la modalità con cui si individuano gli obiettivi generali da perseguire, nonché la capacità di identificare i mezzi più idonei per raggiungerli, la sua attuazione richiederà uno specifico processo. L’aspetto tattico inerente alle tecniche di progettazione digitale riguarda quindi un agire dinamico in cui il processo cambia e si adatta alle sfide successive (Sevaldson, 2005: 32). D’altrocanto, elaborare una strategia progettuale richiede uno sforzo culturale e di visione di insieme più specifico e, in tal senso, viene in aiuto la logica diagrammatica mutuata dal mondo dell’informatica (ovvero il pensiero algoritmico) che facilita il lavoro del progettista digitale, cioè il guardare agli oggetti non più come tali bensì come successione di eventi, aiutandolo a focalizzare l’attenzione sul processo.

Nell’Era Digitale accade sovente che strategie e tecniche tendano a sovrapporsi e da questa sovrapposizione si produce inevitabilmente un’accelerazione espressiva e concettuale del modo in cui i significati di tempo, spazio e interazione si articolano intrinsecamente al progetto digitale (Frazer, 1995: 8). Tutto ciò interessa e coinvolge sempre più da vicino l’operato e le responsabilità del designer digitale.

 

Conclusioni
riassumendo ermeticamente la presente vision, l’elemento essenziale in tutti questi metodi di inferenza digitalizzata sono atti al disvelamento dello spazio inteso come habitat, mirano inesorabilmente al concetto del Closing the gap – di “chiudere il ciclo” – ovverosia garantire che l’esperienza di vita reale dell’utente-finale venga re-immessa nel processo di progettazione tecnologica e al contempo, mi si consenta, permettere al ricercatore/progettista, attraverso una serie di possibili metodi di ricerca e metafore strumentali, di costruire una storia di un problema o di una domanda di ricerca al fine di estrarre significato e dunque imparare da esso.

 

References

the cover is my personal graphic elaboration inspired by Neuromancer comix and the art of UNHIDE school on Bēhance with a bit of “spaghetti” design.

  • 1
    Oxman, N. (2016). Age of Entanglement. Journal of Design and Science. https://doi.org/10.21428/7e0583ad
  • 2
    Sevaldson, B., (2005). Developing Digital Design Techniques. Investigations on Creative Design Computing. Doctoral thesis. Oslo, Oslo School of Architecture and Design, p. 32.
  • 3
    Frazer, J. (1995). An evolutionary architecture. London, Architectural Association, p. 8.. All of this interests and involves the work and responsibilities of the digital designer ever more closely.
  • 4
    Garber, R. (2009). Closing the gap: information models in contemporary design practice. Chichester: Wiley.
  • 5
    Ambrosini, L., (2018), Data, Digital & Design – Produzione del progetto digital e processi decisionali: la progettazione “flessibile” nell’Era dello Scripting e del Building Information Modelling come nuovo paradigma tecnologico, PhD thesis in Architecture. XXXI ciclo, DiARC, Università di Napoli “Federico II”. DOI:  10.13140 / RG.2.2.27158.29769